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OO and story problems

kirby urner-4
I've been haunting the math-teach list, as usual,
suggesting we take a page from AP computer
science and build our math around an interlinked,
themed, consistent set of story problems -- rather
than making these "meaningless" (deliberately).

The opponents in this debate bring up the specter
of political manipulation, propaganda, tainted "pure
math" with someone's good ideas about applications.

My approach to math teaching, as readers here
know (some of 'em), is to bake OO into the matrix
pretty early, meaning the idea of "math objects"
(vectors, polyhedrons, rational numbers) connects
to our Pythonic notion of types.

Here's some background reading for any wanting
to sample the more detailed nuances of this thread
(on-going, and for over a decade for sure).

http://mathforum.org/kb/thread.jspa?threadID=2289577&tstart=0

(most posters long time veterans of this list, with
carved out positions)

I also take it a step further in that the story problems
under consideration often have a strong "off your
duff" component, in that your mathematical reasoning
translates into physical expenditure of energy.

Yes, sounds a lot like summer camp (the "self
quantification movement" also syncs up).

http://fastwonderblog.com/2011/07/30/crunching-the-numbers-open-source-community-metrics-at-oscon/
http://hashtags.foxepractice.com/healthcare-hashtag-analytics.php?hashtag=QuantifiedSelf
http://www.4dsolutions.net/presentations/urnermindstorm.pdf

Kirby
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Re: OO and story problems

Charles Cossé
Greetings, Kirby,
just thought I'd throw-out-there that physics/astronomy can offer a context that is neither meaningless, nor open to political propaganda.   Of course anything can be twisted, but at least it's relatively free from the specters that your opponents point out.  Just a .02 cent thought ....
Cheers,
Charles Cosse

On Fri, Aug 26, 2011 at 10:40 AM, kirby urner <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've been haunting the math-teach list, as usual,
suggesting we take a page from AP computer
science and build our math around an interlinked,
themed, consistent set of story problems -- rather
than making these "meaningless" (deliberately).

The opponents in this debate bring up the specter
of political manipulation, propaganda, tainted "pure
math" with someone's good ideas about applications.

My approach to math teaching, as readers here
know (some of 'em), is to bake OO into the matrix
pretty early, meaning the idea of "math objects"
(vectors, polyhedrons, rational numbers) connects
to our Pythonic notion of types.

Here's some background reading for any wanting
to sample the more detailed nuances of this thread
(on-going, and for over a decade for sure).

http://mathforum.org/kb/thread.jspa?threadID=2289577&tstart=0

(most posters long time veterans of this list, with
carved out positions)

I also take it a step further in that the story problems
under consideration often have a strong "off your
duff" component, in that your mathematical reasoning
translates into physical expenditure of energy.

Yes, sounds a lot like summer camp (the "self
quantification movement" also syncs up).

http://fastwonderblog.com/2011/07/30/crunching-the-numbers-open-source-community-metrics-at-oscon/
http://hashtags.foxepractice.com/healthcare-hashtag-analytics.php?hashtag=QuantifiedSelf
http://www.4dsolutions.net/presentations/urnermindstorm.pdf

Kirby
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          http://www.asymptopia.org

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Re: OO and story problems

kirby urner-4
In reply to this post by kirby urner-4
2011/8/26 Charles Cossé <[hidden email]>:
> Greetings, Kirby,
> just thought I'd throw-out-there that physics/astronomy can offer a context
> that is neither meaningless, nor open to political propaganda.   Of course
> anything can be twisted, but at least it's relatively free from the specters
> that your opponents point out.  Just a .02 cent thought ....
> Cheers,
> Charles Cosse

Yes sir.

Quoting from that very thread (on math-teach):

+++
My approach is like John Saxon's "spiraling" in that
I'd rather connect a lot of story problems into a
consistent framework, in part for mnemonic value.[1]
One may work on more than one framework. The
focus on food distribution below does not preclude
using the solar system and its states of affairs to
anchor other stories. Indeed, these scenarios
partially overlap. The universe is multi-disciplinary.
Geometry + Geography is an organizing heuristic
(a first divide, as distinct from the older trivium /
quadrivium).
+++

http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=7532037&tstart=0

Thanks for jumping in.

Kirby
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Re: OO and story problems

mokurai-2
In reply to this post by Charles Cossé
On Fri, August 26, 2011 2:42 pm, Charles Cossé wrote:
> Greetings, Kirby,
> just thought I'd throw-out-there that physics/astronomy can offer a
> context
> that is neither meaningless, nor open to political propaganda.

It turns out that many Young-Earth Creationists deny the existence of all
of geology (including all methods of dating rocks using radioactive
isotopes) and most of astronomy. We cannot, in their view, see light from
objects more than 10,000 light-years away, which is most of this galaxy
and all of any others, and nothing that we can see can be older than that.
But they generally won't fight you on those issues the way they will on
all of us being descended from (presumably Black) Africans, and they won't
insist on the stars being part of the solid firmament over the Earth where
the rains came through in Noah's Flood. ^_^

> Of course
> anything can be twisted, but at least it's relatively free from the
> specters
> that your opponents point out.

What?!? You don't know about NASA faking the moon landings?

> Just a .02 cent thought ....

I have one word for any of you who want meaningful story problems: sports

The leading world sports, including baseball, soccer, cricket, rugby,
tennis, and golf, have well over a century each of recorded statistics of
amateur and professional leagues. One can do all kinds of probability and
statistics, of course; the combinatorics of tournaments; the paradoxical
aspects of rating systems; and a wide range of physics problems. There is
no need for synthetic interest when you have the real thing. Students who
don't care for sports can do chess (human or AI) or whatever else of
comparable depth interests them. Or politics, thus leading to the
thorniest question of civics: What should we do when government does not
act in a satisfactory manner? in parallel with the question What should we
do when the rules or laws of a game or of a tournament are clearly
unsatisfactory? (Officiating in World Cup Soccer has come under particular
criticism in recent years, as has the practice of deliberately making a
red card (expulsion) foul in the last minute of a game to prevent a goal
by the other side.)

I recommend the book Money Ball for showing how questions of genuine
interest in sports have had real financial consequences in US baseball.
For example, fans love batting averages, but on-base percentage is a much
better predictor of winning games.

> Cheers,
> Charles Cosse
>
> On Fri, Aug 26, 2011 at 10:40 AM, kirby urner <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
>> I've been haunting the math-teach list, as usual,
>> suggesting we take a page from AP computer
>> science and build our math around an interlinked,
>> themed, consistent set of story problems -- rather
>> than making these "meaningless" (deliberately).
>>
>> The opponents in this debate bring up the specter
>> of political manipulation, propaganda, tainted "pure
>> math" with someone's good ideas about applications.
>>
>> My approach to math teaching, as readers here
>> know (some of 'em), is to bake OO into the matrix
>> pretty early, meaning the idea of "math objects"
>> (vectors, polyhedrons, rational numbers) connects
>> to our Pythonic notion of types.
>>
>> Here's some background reading for any wanting
>> to sample the more detailed nuances of this thread
>> (on-going, and for over a decade for sure).
>>
>> http://mathforum.org/kb/thread.jspa?threadID=2289577&tstart=0
>>
>> (most posters long time veterans of this list, with
>> carved out positions)
>>
>> I also take it a step further in that the story problems
>> under consideration often have a strong "off your
>> duff" component, in that your mathematical reasoning
>> translates into physical expenditure of energy.
>>
>> Yes, sounds a lot like summer camp (the "self
>> quantification movement" also syncs up).
>>
>>
>> http://fastwonderblog.com/2011/07/30/crunching-the-numbers-open-source-community-metrics-at-oscon/
>>
>> http://hashtags.foxepractice.com/healthcare-hashtag-analytics.php?hashtag=QuantifiedSelf
>> http://www.4dsolutions.net/presentations/urnermindstorm.pdf
>>
>> Kirby
>> _______________________________________________
>> Edu-sig mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edu-sig
>>
>
>
>
> --
> AsymptopiaSoftware|Software@theLimit
>           http://www.asymptopia.org
> _______________________________________________
> Edu-sig mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edu-sig
>


--
Edward Mokurai
(&#40664;&#38647;/&#2343;&#2352;&#2381;&#2350;&#2350;&#2375;&#2328;&#2358;&#2348;&#2381;&#2342;&#2327;&#2352;&#2381;&#2332;/&#1583;&#1726;&#1585;&#1605;&#1605;&#1740;&#1711;&#1726;&#1588;&#1576;&#1583;&#1711;&#1585;
&#1580;) Cherlin
Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks


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Re: OO and story problems

kirby urner-4
2011/8/27  <[hidden email]>:

> It turns out that many Young-Earth Creationists deny the existence of all
> of geology (including all methods of dating rocks using radioactive
> isotopes) and most of astronomy. We cannot, in their view, see light from
> objects more than 10,000 light-years away, which is most of this galaxy
> and all of any others, and nothing that we can see can be older than that.
> But they generally won't fight you on those issues the way they will on
> all of us being descended from (presumably Black) Africans, and they won't
> insist on the stars being part of the solid firmament over the Earth where
> the rains came through in Noah's Flood. ^_^

Cosmologies come under geography in my Geometry + Geography
heuristic.

I encourage sharing many cosmologies and use a spectrum of
literal versus symbolic (to be simplistic about it).  Karen Armstrong
wrote pretty well on this didn't she ('Battle for God' etc.)

Some creation myths, such as Bucky's in 'Tetrascroll', aren't
designed to be taken literally ("a cosmic fairy tale" is the subtitle).

I liked 'Sita Sings the Blues', an adaptation of the Ramayana.

http://worldgame.blogspot.com/2011/08/sita-sings-blues-movie-review.html

I'm hoping Gagus will like my idea of using Indonesian shadow
puppets to teach Python.  We have enough lighting for puppets
after dark.

Welcome to XO country right?  Rugged and outdoorsy.

Richard Stallman in Sri Lanka:  I have a poster about that in my blog.

http://worldgame.blogspot.com/2011/04/richard-stallman-at-psu.html

>> Of course
>> anything can be twisted, but at least it's relatively free from the
>> specters
>> that your opponents point out.
>
> What?!? You don't know about NASA faking the moon landings?
>

Lets cut people some slack though:  they are often the
target of misinformation campaigns.  Salvos go out
daily from these "news sources" as you know.
NASA's are pretty good (I subscribe to a news feed).

Some others are pretty terrible.

In general the defenses seem kinda weak around here,
even against only mediocre spin doctors.

I've got a pretty entertaining rant about that from 2005:

http://worldgame.blogspot.com/2005/12/big-foot-strikes.html

>> Just a .02 cent thought ....
>
> I have one word for any of you who want meaningful story problems: sports
>

Yes, sports is a fine entry point, I agree, especially when you
zoom in on the human body and just focus on athletics in the
sense of scripted / practiced motion, picking up dance, theater
and musical performance.

In the field I describe, we've had a triathlete join us, using our
story problem output as a chief source of nutrition.

Solving our story problems requires exertion.

Not everyone is equally able to do all the problems, but that's
not a big worry.  We talk about our various gifts and leadings
and divvy the labor.  Self organization is key, without too
much overhead.

One of my fears is that as we grow bigger and more
successful, our bureaucratic layer will grow.

> The leading world sports, including baseball, soccer, cricket, rugby,
> tennis, and golf, have well over a century each of recorded statistics of
> amateur and professional leagues. One can do all kinds of probability and
> statistics, of course; the combinatorics of tournaments; the paradoxical
> aspects of rating systems; and a wide range of physics problems. There is
> no need for synthetic interest when you have the real thing. Students who
> don't care for sports can do chess (human or AI) or whatever else of
> comparable depth interests them. Or politics, thus leading to the
> thorniest question of civics: What should we do when government does not
> act in a satisfactory manner? in parallel with the question What should we
> do when the rules or laws of a game or of a tournament are clearly
> unsatisfactory? (Officiating in World Cup Soccer has come under particular
> criticism in recent years, as has the practice of deliberately making a
> red card (expulsion) foul in the last minute of a game to prevent a goal
> by the other side.)
>

Questions of ethics matter yes.  And what are young bodies doing
with themselves to keep in shape?  We usually separate that question
from mathematics, but as I've been saying, the self quantification
movement is suggesting a lifestyle where we take bold interest
in our many personal statistics.  This naturally feeds into the baseball
fascination (for example), where statistics have been king for a long
time.

I'd not want to encourage couch potato approaches to sports.
Archery.  Now there's a good one.  Also skating of various kinds,
and skiing (including on water).

First Person Physics fits in here too.  As a certified scuba diver,
I can tell you we got quite a bit of physics and chemistry in the
lectures.  Gas laws, Boyle's Law, no Gibbs Phase Rule that
I recall but it would have fit.

> I recommend the book Money Ball for showing how questions of genuine
> interest in sports have had real financial consequences in US baseball.
> For example, fans love batting averages, but on-base percentage is a much
> better predictor of winning games.
>

I write about geocaching quite a bit... (have done some, more planned).

Facility with statistics bolsters the school's ability to marshal data
about its local environment.  Ideally, a school is a repository of local
lore and history (which the students study).  In practice, the local
is often eclipsed by some "standard" (blech).  Doesn't have to be
either / or.

I don't want to give the impression it's all about statistics though.

My thread with the math teachers goes into geometry quite a bit,
usually spatial, not just plane.  Then there's a passage on Vegetable
Group Soup, which turns out to be group theory (Galois Fields,
Cayley Tables and like that).  There's Python for this part, but
also Flash, JavaScript, lots of other stuff.

Kirby
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python functions and Riemann Sums

A. Jorge Garcia
My students are having fun writing python functions to estimate
definite integrals,

http://shadowfaxrant.blogspot.com/2012/03/quarter-iii-week-6-screencasts.html

HTH,
A. Jorge Garcia
Applied Math and CompSci
http://shadowfaxrant.blogspot.com
http://www.youtube.com/calcpage2009



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python, SAGE and Riemann Sums!

A. Jorge Garcia
My students are using python and SAGE to do Riemann Sums!

http://shadowfaxrant.blogspot.com/2012/03/quarter-iii-week-7-screencasts.html

HTH,
A. Jorge Garcia
Applied Math and CompSci
http://shadowfaxrant.blogspot.com
http://www.youtube.com/calcpage2009




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Re: python, SAGE and Riemann Sums!

Berkin Malkoc
Hi,

On Tue, Mar 27, 2012 at 6:56 PM, A. Jorge Garcia <[hidden email]> wrote:
My students are using python and SAGE to do Riemann Sums!

http://shadowfaxrant.blogspot.com/2012/03/quarter-iii-week-7-screencasts.html

About a week ago, you had posted a very similar message to sage-edu and got negative criticism due to it leading directly to a donation request instead of a readily enjoyable relevant content. Then you had improved upon your message by giving direct links to your Sage worksheets (which was nice, I think).

So, why a retrograde step on python-edu just one week later?

Berkin

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Re: python, SAGE and Riemann Sums!

A. Jorge Garcia
In reply to this post by A. Jorge Garcia
OOPs, wrong link!

https://sage.math.clemson.edu:34567/home/pub/297/

Fear not, this is a direct link to my published worksheet where we
cleaned up out functions a bit.

Enjoy,
A. Jorge Garcia
Applied Math and CompSci
http://shadowfaxrant.blogspot.com
http://www.youtube.com/calcpage2009


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