Which shell to use

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
4 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Which shell to use

ray spiering
Good morning,
 
I am trying to use/teach Python 3.0 in a classroom environment.
Should I use the shell that was part of the download, or one of the
improved shells that I read about on the web?
 
Thanks,
   Joe


_______________________________________________
Edu-sig mailing list
[hidden email]
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edu-sig
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Which shell to use

kirby urner-4

Good question.

Depends *a lot* on the curriculum.

If students are just being introduced to the idea of an REPL (read evaluate print loop) then 
showing off more than one IDE at the outset might prove enlightening.

Show & Tell:  Python with vim in Linux shell.

Show & Tell:  Python with IDLE with Akbar font (one of my faves)


Show & Tell:  Python with PyDev module (still being improved) in Eclipse.

The last one is what I end up using with students these days, but I've mostly used IDLE in other classrooms.

Kirby

On Tue, Mar 8, 2011 at 8:23 AM, ray spiering <[hidden email]> wrote:
Good morning,
 
I am trying to use/teach Python 3.0 in a classroom environment.
Should I use the shell that was part of the download, or one of the
improved shells that I read about on the web?
 
Thanks,
   Joe


_______________________________________________
Edu-sig mailing list
[hidden email]
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edu-sig



_______________________________________________
Edu-sig mailing list
[hidden email]
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edu-sig
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Which shell to use

kirby urner-4


On Wed, Mar 9, 2011 at 3:49 PM, Gregor Lingl <[hidden email]> schrieb:

Some might prefer a monospaced font like the beautiful "Liberation Mono" (GNU General Public License) for instance. Using a non monospace font can be irritating sometimes concerning the indentation.


I should check that out.  Fonts that include big swatches of Unicode (such as Kanji) should be fun as well.

Note that Akbar and other non-monospace aren't that bad for left-aligned languages such as Python, FORTRAN etc., as the space characters share the same width, so the block indentations appear as rigidly vertical as New Courier's.

 
Anyway IDLE is a very good choice for beginners, because it's small (and thus not distracting) but has everything you need during the first year of learning how to program. (In my experience it's disadvantageous to use an editor or an IDE that demands a substantial part of the learning energy and efforts of the students.)

It's also open source in Tkinter so you can scroll through quickly and get an idea of what GUI-based Python is all about.  It's pretty easy to get productive in a hurry with Tk bindings -- which is the chief weakness of IDLE:  it makes for a crazy-bad Tk development environment, which is what one might be inspired to do, having used IDLE.  That's when one starts learning how to boot Python from a command line.  

If you're not used to a command line, because you're an eye candy junky, on either MacOS or Windows, then here's a golden opportunity to learn on.  Then, after learning to go chdir, mkdir, rmdir and whatever, jump into Python's os and shutils and accomplish the same things -- good reinforcement.

Learning to love a command line is a core goal of "beginner mind" trainings.

Kirby


_______________________________________________
Edu-sig mailing list
[hidden email]
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edu-sig
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Which shell to use

Laura Creighton-2
In reply to this post by ray spiering
This can be fun to use - or at least I assume the 3.x version is as
much fun as the 2.x version.  

http://ipython.scipy.org/moin/Python3

Laura

_______________________________________________
Edu-sig mailing list
[hidden email]
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/edu-sig