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making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

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making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

m h
Hey Folks-

I'm using pdb (from gud.el) with emacs, which is working pretty good.
I've got two gripes.

  * After I run pdb on a testfile, the point goes to the top of the buffer
  * I'd like to be able to click on files in the stacktrace (on
unittest failures) and have emacs open the buffer to the correct line

I figure if I can fix the later 80% of the other issues are covered.
Any pointers or tips are greatly appreciated.  I've searched gud.el
for alist and find-file, but alas my elisp is not quite up to snuff to
tell if this is actually supported.

cheers,

-matt
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Barry Warsaw
On Jan 18, 2010, at 06:27 PM, m h wrote:

>I'm using pdb (from gud.el) with emacs, which is working pretty good.
>I've got two gripes.
>
>  * After I run pdb on a testfile, the point goes to the top of the buffer
>  * I'd like to be able to click on files in the stacktrace (on
>unittest failures) and have emacs open the buffer to the correct line
>
>I figure if I can fix the later 80% of the other issues are covered.
>Any pointers or tips are greatly appreciated.  I've searched gud.el
>for alist and find-file, but alas my elisp is not quite up to snuff to
>tell if this is actually supported.
I'm afraid I can't help much.  I generally use pdb-track instead of gud, and
haven't really noticed any problems.

-Barry

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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

m h
On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 7:28 AM, Barry Warsaw <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Jan 18, 2010, at 06:27 PM, m h wrote:
>
>>I'm using pdb (from gud.el) with emacs, which is working pretty good.
>>I've got two gripes.
>>
>>  * After I run pdb on a testfile, the point goes to the top of the buffer
>>  * I'd like to be able to click on files in the stacktrace (on
>>unittest failures) and have emacs open the buffer to the correct line
>>
>>I figure if I can fix the later 80% of the other issues are covered.
>>Any pointers or tips are greatly appreciated.  I've searched gud.el
>>for alist and find-file, but alas my elisp is not quite up to snuff to
>>tell if this is actually supported.
>
> I'm afraid I can't help much.  I generally use pdb-track instead of gud, and
> haven't really noticed any problems.

Wow, didn't you add python support to gud?

Would you (or anyone else) care to mention their workflow?  I've just
been trying to get python-mode C-c C-c to allow me to use pdb.  But I
get an error:

> <stdin>(181)_test()
(Pdb)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 186, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 181, in _test
  File "<stdin>", line 181, in _test
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/bdb.py", line 46, in trace_dispatch
    return self.dispatch_line(frame)
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/bdb.py", line 65, in dispatch_line
    if self.quitting: raise BdbQuit
bdb.BdbQuit


How do I invoke pdbtrack from python-mode?

I usually have unittests or doctests for my modules, when I've got
problems I like to step through, so I insert a 'import pdb;
pdb.set_trace' and run through M-x pdb.  I'd be interested in what
others are doing.

-matt
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Barry Warsaw
On Jan 19, 2010, at 12:18 PM, m h wrote:

>Wow, didn't you add python support to gud?

If I did, it was a million years ago and I don't remember it ;).

>Would you (or anyone else) care to mention their workflow?  I've just
>been trying to get python-mode C-c C-c to allow me to use pdb.  But I
>get an error:
>
>> <stdin>(181)_test()
>(Pdb)
>Traceback (most recent call last):
>  File "<stdin>", line 186, in <module>
>  File "<stdin>", line 181, in _test
>  File "<stdin>", line 181, in _test
>  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/bdb.py", line 46, in trace_dispatch
>    return self.dispatch_line(frame)
>  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/bdb.py", line 65, in dispatch_line
>    if self.quitting: raise BdbQuit
>bdb.BdbQuit
>
>How do I invoke pdbtrack from python-mode?
It's really easy.  You still insert 'import pdb; pdb.set_trace()' at the spot
in your code where you want to break.  Then run your code from a shell buffer.
When you hit the break point, you'll drop into pdb.  pdb-track will notice the
new prompt and you'll be able to interact with it right there.  You'll use pdb
commands but you'll get the nice two-screen view with code tracking.

I owe Ken Manheimer a lifetime supply of [insert beverage] for this beautiful
hack.

-Barry

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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

m h
Thanks much for the responses!

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 2:25 PM, Barry Warsaw <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Jan 19, 2010, at 12:18 PM, m h wrote:
>
>>Wow, didn't you add python support to gud?
>
> If I did, it was a million years ago and I don't remember it ;).
>

:)

>>Would you (or anyone else) care to mention their workflow?  I've just
>>been trying to get python-mode C-c C-c to allow me to use pdb.  But I
>>get an error:
>>
>>> <stdin>(181)_test()
>>(Pdb)
>>Traceback (most recent call last):
>>  File "<stdin>", line 186, in <module>
>>  File "<stdin>", line 181, in _test
>>  File "<stdin>", line 181, in _test
>>  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/bdb.py", line 46, in trace_dispatch
>>    return self.dispatch_line(frame)
>>  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/bdb.py", line 65, in dispatch_line
>>    if self.quitting: raise BdbQuit
>>bdb.BdbQuit
>>
>>How do I invoke pdbtrack from python-mode?
>
> It's really easy.  You still insert 'import pdb; pdb.set_trace()' at the spot
> in your code where you want to break.  Then run your code from a shell buffer.
> When you hit the break point, you'll drop into pdb.  pdb-track will notice the
> new prompt and you'll be able to interact with it right there.  You'll use pdb
> commands but you'll get the nice two-screen view with code tracking.
>

So just to be explicit about what 'run your code from a shell buffer'.  I tried:

1- C-c !
2- type `execfile('filename.py')` into python shell
3- hit breakpoint/nirvana

Is that how you do it, or is there another way?  It'd be nice not to
have to type out part 2.  Right now I have a macro bound to f-11 that
re-runs my last pdb command.  I guess M-p (like ctr-p in terminal)
works ok too in  that it scrolls through the command histories.

So that get's rid of one of my problems (gud/pdb scrolls buffer to
top).  Anyway to make it recognize files and make them clickable in
the python shell?

cheers-

-matt

-matt
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Barry Warsaw
On Jan 19, 2010, at 03:06 PM, m h wrote:

>So just to be explicit about what 'run your code from a shell buffer'.  I tried:
>
>1- C-c !
>2- type `execfile('filename.py')` into python shell
>3- hit breakpoint/nirvana

Actually, no!  Seriously, run it in a shell buffer. :)

M-x shell RET
% python filename.py
hit breakpoint/nirvana

:)

>Is that how you do it, or is there another way?  It'd be nice not to
>have to type out part 2.  Right now I have a macro bound to f-11 that
>re-runs my last pdb command.  I guess M-p (like ctr-p in terminal)
>works ok too in  that it scrolls through the command histories.
>
>So that get's rid of one of my problems (gud/pdb scrolls buffer to
>top).  Anyway to make it recognize files and make them clickable in
>the python shell?

"clickable"?  Is that like using that mouse thing?  To paraphrase a wise man,
"There's no clicking in Emacs!" :)

-Barry

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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

m h
(forgot to reply to list)

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 4:36 PM, Barry Warsaw <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Jan 19, 2010, at 03:06 PM, m h wrote:
>
>>So just to be explicit about what 'run your code from a shell buffer'.  I tried:
>>
>>1- C-c !
>>2- type `execfile('filename.py')` into python shell
>>3- hit breakpoint/nirvana
>
> Actually, no!  Seriously, run it in a shell buffer. :)
>
> M-x shell RET
> % python filename.py
> hit breakpoint/nirvana
>

I was using M-x ansi-shell....  It worked in M-x shell.  Thanks.

> :)
>
>>Is that how you do it, or is there another way?  It'd be nice not to
>>have to type out part 2.  Right now I have a macro bound to f-11 that
>>re-runs my last pdb command.  I guess M-p (like ctr-p in terminal)
>>works ok too in  that it scrolls through the command histories.
>>
>>So that get's rid of one of my problems (gud/pdb scrolls buffer to
>>top).  Anyway to make it recognize files and make them clickable in
>>the python shell?
>
> "clickable"?  Is that like using that mouse thing?  To paraphrase a wise man,
> "There's no clicking in Emacs!" :)
>

;)  Yeah, I'm trying to avoid that bad habit of 'clicking'.

ok, how about 'hyperlinkable'?  I've got an ack.el extension that
searches for files, in it's buffer you can move the cursor over the
file (with the keyboard!) and hit enter and it will pop you to that
file/linum.

-matt
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Jeff Bauer
In reply to this post by Barry Warsaw
> "clickable"?  Is that like using that mouse thing?  To
> paraphrase a wise man, "There's no clicking in Emacs!" :)

But the track ball scroll wheel is AWESOME.

I've never tried running pdb from an emacs shell.  Thanks
for the tip!

Jeff Bauer
Rubicon, Inc.
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

m h
In reply to this post by Barry Warsaw
On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 4:58 PM, Barry Warsaw <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Jan 19, 2010, at 04:45 PM, m h wrote:
>
>>I was using M-x ansi-shell....  It worked in M-x shell.  Thanks.
>
> M-x ansi-term?  How old am I, I didn't even know about that one? :)
>

I got tipped off to it, and honestly can't remember why I'm using it
instead of M-x shell.

>>>>So that get's rid of one of my problems (gud/pdb scrolls buffer to
>>>>top).  Anyway to make it recognize files and make them clickable in
>>>>the python shell?
>>>
>>> "clickable"?  Is that like using that mouse thing?  To paraphrase a wise man,
>>> "There's no clicking in Emacs!" :)
>>>
>>
>>;)  Yeah, I'm trying to avoid that bad habit of 'clicking'.
>>
>>ok, how about 'hyperlinkable'?  I've got an ack.el extension that
>>searches for files, in it's buffer you can move the cursor over the
>>file (with the keyboard!) and hit enter and it will pop you to that
>>file/linum.
>
> I'm honestly unable to answer that question.  It not something I do often
> believe it or not.  Mostly I use tags and some Bazaar hacks to find what I'm
> looking for.  Maybe someone else on the list has some ideas here?

Yeah, someone sent me some ideas, I'll mess around with them, and
report back if I figure something out.

Thanks for the tip of pdb-track.

cheers,
-matt
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Barry Warsaw
In reply to this post by Jeff Bauer
On Jan 19, 2010, at 06:12 PM, Jeff Bauer wrote:

>> "clickable"?  Is that like using that mouse thing?  To
>> paraphrase a wise man, "There's no clicking in Emacs!" :)
>
>But the track ball scroll wheel is AWESOME.

Hi Jeff!  Yes, I completely agree. :)

-Barry

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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Andreas Röhler-2
In reply to this post by m h
m h wrote:

> Thanks much for the responses!
>
> On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 2:25 PM, Barry Warsaw <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Jan 19, 2010, at 12:18 PM, m h wrote:
>>
>>> Wow, didn't you add python support to gud?
>> If I did, it was a million years ago and I don't remember it ;).
>>
>
> :)
>
>>> Would you (or anyone else) care to mention their workflow?  I've just
>>> been trying to get python-mode C-c C-c to allow me to use pdb.  But I
>>> get an error:
>>>
>>>> <stdin>(181)_test()
>>> (Pdb)
>>> Traceback (most recent call last):
>>>  File "<stdin>", line 186, in <module>
>>>  File "<stdin>", line 181, in _test
>>>  File "<stdin>", line 181, in _test
>>>  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/bdb.py", line 46, in trace_dispatch
>>>    return self.dispatch_line(frame)
>>>  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/bdb.py", line 65, in dispatch_line
>>>    if self.quitting: raise BdbQuit
>>> bdb.BdbQuit
>>>
>>> How do I invoke pdbtrack from python-mode?
>> It's really easy.  You still insert 'import pdb; pdb.set_trace()' at the spot
>> in your code where you want to break.  Then run your code from a shell buffer.
>> When you hit the break point, you'll drop into pdb.  pdb-track will notice the
>> new prompt and you'll be able to interact with it right there.  You'll use pdb
>> commands but you'll get the nice two-screen view with code tracking.
>>
>
> So just to be explicit about what 'run your code from a shell buffer'.  I tried:
>
> 1- C-c !
> 2- type `execfile('filename.py')` into python shell
> 3- hit breakpoint/nirvana
>

Hi,

assume you called ipython with C-c !.
The command then is simply

run  filename.py

pdb works that way too

Andreas


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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

m h
Hey all-

I got my original wish, compile-mode error navigation through the
python stack trace of a unittest failure.

Thanks to Gerard B for the hint.

 I'm doing this from pdbtrack (shell) instead of pure pdb, but it
should work in both I believe. You need to enable
compilation-shell-minor-mode. And have the following code in your
.emacs:

;; if compilation-shell-minor-mode is on, then these regexes
;; will make errors linkable
(defun matt-add-global-compilation-errors (list)
  (dolist (x list)
    (add-to-list 'compilation-error-regexp-alist (car x))
    (setq compilation-error-regexp-alist-alist
      (cons x
            (assq-delete-all (car x)
                             compilation-error-regexp-alist-alist)))))

(matt-add-global-compilation-errors
 `(
   (matt-python ,(concat "^ *File \\(\"?\\)\\([^,\" \n    <>]+\\)\\1"
                    ", lines? \\([0-9]+\\)-?\\([0-9]+\\)?")
           2 (3 . 4) nil 2 2)
   (matt-pdb-stack ,(concat "^>?[[:space:]]*\\(\\([-_./a-zA-Z0-9 ]+\\)"
                       "(\\([0-9]+\\))\\)"
                       "[_a-zA-Z0-9]+()[[:space:]]*->")
              2 3 nil 0 1)
   (matt-python-unittest-err "^  File \"\\([-_./a-zA-Z0-9 ]+\\)\",
line \\([0-9]+\\).*" 1 2)
   )
 )

(defun matt-set-local-compilation-errors (errors)
  "Set the buffer local compilation errors.

Ensures than any symbols given are defined in
compilation-error-regexp-alist-alist."
  (dolist (e errors)
     (when (symbolp e)
      (unless (assoc e compilation-error-regexp-alist-alist)
        (error (concat "Error %s is not listed in "
                       "compilation-error-regexp-alist-alist")
               e))))
  (set (make-local-variable 'compilation-error-regexp-alist)
       errors))

Then you can use standard compile mode navigation to zip through the
error stack trace.

cheers,

-matt
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

François Pinard
In reply to this post by Barry Warsaw
Barry Warsaw <[hidden email]> writes:

>>How do I invoke pdbtrack from python-mode?

> It's really easy.  You still insert 'import pdb; pdb.set_trace()' at the spot
> in your code where you want to break.  Then run your code from a shell buffer.
> When you hit the break point, you'll drop into pdb.  pdb-track will notice the
> new prompt and you'll be able to interact with it right there.  You'll use pdb
> commands but you'll get the nice two-screen view with code tracking.

Hi, python-mode people.

I quote Barry's explanation above, as an example of fruitful
instructions about how to use python-mode.  Looking at the mailing list
archives, here and there, I read other nice advice or tricks.

But it's a pity that these did not get collected into a user
documentation.  So my suggestions:

* take the above quote and drop it *as is* within the README file (yes,
  the README, not in the doc/ directory, nor any fancier place).  Right
  now, without hesitation.

* whenever any usage advice is given on the list, someone with commit
  powers immediately copies it, as is, within the README.

* do not try to devise a fancy structure or flowing text right away, the
  emergency right now is to give some informational meat to users,
  rather than a nice structure filled with lots of TBDs (to be done).
  The TBDs should go to the TODO file (which, by the way, is the
  traditional capitalisation for it), not in the README.

* do not worry, structure will come very naturally, later, as material
  accumulates within README.  Information first, structure later.

* integrate the INSTALL file within README, get rid of it as a separate
  file.  It is not worth a file as it stands right now.  Let it grow
  within README, and give it an existence in a separate file only when
  it will hold enough substance to be worth its own file.  Do not think
  "INSTALL exists so people may start without having to read README".
  On the contrary, manage so users will more likely peruse README.

* get rid of doc/, or at least change its name.  Users are mislead to
  think there is a documentation in there that is usable for them.

François

P.S. Reading further, Barry wrote:

> I owe Ken Manheimer a lifetime supply of [insert beverage] for this
> beautiful hack.

Sigh!  If only I could have developed something so attractive that Barry
did such an offer to *me*.  I spoiled my life! :-)

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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Jeff Bauer
François,

Hah!  So funny for you to bring up *that* specific post from
Barry.  It's been sitting in my inbox as msg #1 for the past
couple years.  Even though I copied it to my org notes, I've
always had it there.  So when your email arrived, my reader
threaded it back to Barry's 2-year-old post.  What!?

Then I read your text and it all made sense.  ;-)

P.S. to Barry: My upgrade to Emacs 24 via launchpad has been
a totally painless non-event.

Jeff "Shawn White" Bauer
Rubicon, Inc.


On Thu, Jan 26, 2012 at 10:44:05PM -0500, François Pinard wrote:

> Barry Warsaw <[hidden email]> writes:
>
> >>How do I invoke pdbtrack from python-mode?
>
> > It's really easy.  You still insert 'import pdb; pdb.set_trace()' at the spot
> > in your code where you want to break.  Then run your code from a shell buffer.
> > When you hit the break point, you'll drop into pdb.  pdb-track will notice the
> > new prompt and you'll be able to interact with it right there.  You'll use pdb
> > commands but you'll get the nice two-screen view with code tracking.
>
> Hi, python-mode people.
>
> I quote Barry's explanation above, as an example of fruitful
> instructions about how to use python-mode.  Looking at the mailing list
> archives, here and there, I read other nice advice or tricks.
>
> But it's a pity that these did not get collected into a user
> documentation.  So my suggestions:
>
> * take the above quote and drop it *as is* within the README file (yes,
>   the README, not in the doc/ directory, nor any fancier place).  Right
>   now, without hesitation.
>
> * whenever any usage advice is given on the list, someone with commit
>   powers immediately copies it, as is, within the README.
>
> * do not try to devise a fancy structure or flowing text right away, the
>   emergency right now is to give some informational meat to users,
>   rather than a nice structure filled with lots of TBDs (to be done).
>   The TBDs should go to the TODO file (which, by the way, is the
>   traditional capitalisation for it), not in the README.
>
> * do not worry, structure will come very naturally, later, as material
>   accumulates within README.  Information first, structure later.
>
> * integrate the INSTALL file within README, get rid of it as a separate
>   file.  It is not worth a file as it stands right now.  Let it grow
>   within README, and give it an existence in a separate file only when
>   it will hold enough substance to be worth its own file.  Do not think
>   "INSTALL exists so people may start without having to read README".
>   On the contrary, manage so users will more likely peruse README.
>
> * get rid of doc/, or at least change its name.  Users are mislead to
>   think there is a documentation in there that is usable for them.
>
> François
>
> P.S. Reading further, Barry wrote:
>
> > I owe Ken Manheimer a lifetime supply of [insert beverage] for this
> > beautiful hack.
>
> Sigh!  If only I could have developed something so attractive that Barry
> did such an offer to *me*.  I spoiled my life! :-)
>
> _______________________________________________
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> [hidden email]
> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-mode
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Barry Warsaw
In reply to this post by François Pinard
On Jan 26, 2012, at 10:44 PM, François Pinard wrote:

>Sigh!  If only I could have developed something so attractive that Barry
>did such an offer to *me*.  I spoiled my life! :-)

There's still time.

:)

-Barry
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Barry Warsaw
In reply to this post by Jeff Bauer
On Jan 26, 2012, at 10:12 PM, Jeff Bauer wrote:

>Hah!  So funny for you to bring up *that* specific post from
>Barry.  It's been sitting in my inbox as msg #1 for the past
>couple years.  Even though I copied it to my org notes, I've
>always had it there.  So when your email arrived, my reader
>threaded it back to Barry's 2-year-old post.  What!?

Wait.  I wrote that two *freakin'* years ago?!

>P.S. to Barry: My upgrade to Emacs 24 via launchpad has been
>a totally painless non-event.

\o/

So, who's gonna be at Pycon this year?

-Barry
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

François Pinard
In reply to this post by Jeff Bauer
Jeff Bauer <[hidden email]> writes:

> Hah!  So funny for you to bring up *that* specific post from Barry.

:-)

> So when your email arrived, my reader threaded it back to Barry's
> 2-year-old post.

Old email, that's always fun!

Soon after Guido announced his first release of Python, a long long time
ago, I tried it.  At the time, I was trying everything :-).  And
besides, I was already prejudiced towards Guido because of his competent
implication as a maintainer of the Audio/Sound FAQ (if I remember
correctly).  We corresponded for a little while on a friendly tone.  I
did not stay with Python for long, the window system coming with it was
not as usable as I initially hoped.  Life is such that I forgot the
whole matter for about nine or ten years, maybe.

Then, Han-Wen (from the Lilypond fame) convinced me to give Python a
good look.  I guess it was Python 1.5.2 at the time, which I found very
worth learning and using; no trace anymore of a window system or Emacs
emulator to distract me from the language.  Cleaning around, I found an
old letter from Guido, written at the time of my initial tries,
containing many interesting comments.  So I replied specifically to
these comments, and Guido replied to my reply, and we pursued the
conversation exactly as if it has been from yesterday! :-) It was kind
of surrealist, naive, and fun!

François
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Re: making stack traces clickable in gud.el pdb output.

Barry Warsaw
On Jan 27, 2012, at 11:19 PM, François Pinard wrote:

>Soon after Guido announced his first release of Python, a long long time
>ago, I tried it.  At the time, I was trying everything :-).  And
>besides, I was already prejudiced towards Guido because of his competent
>implication as a maintainer of the Audio/Sound FAQ (if I remember
>correctly).  We corresponded for a little while on a friendly tone.  I
>did not stay with Python for long, the window system coming with it was
>not as usable as I initially hoped.  Life is such that I forgot the
>whole matter for about nine or ten years, maybe.

I remember when comp.lang.python was created.  Sure, I'm a Monty Python fan,
but the first (seems like) several months of posts were just about the comedy
team and had very little to do with a new language.  So I ignored it, until
about 1994.

>Then, Han-Wen (from the Lilypond fame) convinced me to give Python a
>good look.  I guess it was Python 1.5.2 at the time, which I found very
>worth learning and using; no trace anymore of a window system or Emacs
>emulator to distract me from the language.  Cleaning around, I found an
>old letter from Guido, written at the time of my initial tries,
>containing many interesting comments.  So I replied specifically to
>these comments, and Guido replied to my reply, and we pursued the
>conversation exactly as if it has been from yesterday! :-) It was kind
>of surrealist, naive, and fun!

How cool!

-Barry
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